North Dakota is officially out of the drought that plagued us the last two years.  We sure paid the price last summer with the 90s and 100s temperatures for most of the summer.  For those of you who love summers like that, this summer has been just a little different so far.  Heck, we even had high temps in the 60s this past Saturday.  That was unheard of last June.

The reason why we've been cooler so far this summer has been the wet spring we encountered.  More moisture in the soil and you're going to have cooler temperatures.

However, just when we thought the "Bismarck Bubble" was a thing of the past, the latest forecast from the Climate Prediction Center from the National Weather Service may say otherwise.

You may have noticed this past Friday that much of the state had severe weather and torrential rainfall.  In fact, highways were literally washed out in northeastern North Dakota because of how much rain fell, and how fast it came down.

That was not the case here in Bismarck.  We barely saw a drop of rain.  Storms set up to the north and to the southeast of us and we missed out on some beneficial rain.  The same with some previous systems the last couple of weeks.  "The Bismarck Bubble" seems to be trying to make a comeback.

Well, I sure hope not, but the latest 3-month outlook from the Climate Prediction Center seems to echo that thought.  The July forecast looks like it could go either way with precipitation, but the 3-month outlook for the state is for dry conditions.  That means August and September could be significantly drier.  I remember last year, we barely saw a drop of rain those two months.  Here's the 3-month precipitation outlook for us from the Climate Prediction Center.

 

NOAA Climate Prediction Center
NOAA Climate Prediction Center
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Temperatures on the other hand don't look like they will get out of hand like they did last year.  Again, mostly due to the wet spring.  Here's the latest temperature outlook for the next three months.  They look to be average.

NOAA-Climate Prediction Center
NOAA-Climate Prediction Center
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My lawn is starting to turn yellow/brown again.  Let's hope "The Bismarck Bubble" is NOT making a comeback.


 

LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.

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