Some North Dakota homebuyers may be able to get assistance with their mortgages.

Buying a home is not cheap and it may seem impossible to come up with the money to even get a downpayment. But, if you are a hopeful homebuyer in North Dakota, you may be able to get assistance.

There are different types of assistance available for potential homebuyers in North Dakota.

Insider reports that some homebuyers could qualify for assistance North Dakota Housing Finance Agency (NDHFA). There are different types of assistance available, depending on whether or not you are a first-time homebuyer. But, looking at the information provided by Insider might be kind of discouraging to some of those dreaming about buying a home.

Income limits for assistance in North Dakota seem low.

The income limits for assistance seem low. According to Insider, a family of three or fewer must make no more than $100,800 and a family with more than three must make no more than $115,920 to qualify for assistance through NDHFA's FirstHome Program. And a single person looking for assistance with money down or closing costs must make no more than $55,590 - this information is specific to the area.

While those amounts are not considered to be poverty-level income, the limits for assistance should be adjusted quite a bit. Why? Because it is so expensive to live, even in cheap old North Dakota. When you consider how much things like taxes, vehicles, groceries, rent/ mortgage, and any other recurring expenses cost, people really do not have a lot left over to save up for a downpayment on a house.

Do you think the income limits for home buying assistance should be increased for North Dakotans?

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