The 'Day After' is always the worst when it comes to reading about the realities of impaired drivers

Another New Years's Eve has come and gone. Pretty soon we can get back to our normal routine, the holidays are over. Through the stretch from Thanksgiving to New Years Day, relatives coming to town, going out to eat, and attending parties are all part of the traditions. So is alcohol. When I refer to the 'Day After' we usually wake up on January 2nd and read about arrests made on New Year's Eve pertaining to DUI's ( driving under the influence ) and sadly tragic deaths caused by simple lack of judgments. The news is always grim, but not this year.

Fargo Police just released some New Year's Eve statistics

As of this morning ( January 2nd ), I have not come across any news from Bismarck/Mandan Police on arrests made or any casualties from New Years's Eve. I did see this story just yesterday. Fargo, North Dakota has an estimated population of 125,804, and worldpopulationreview.com reports "it is the largest city in North Dakota and the 225th largest city in the United States". That's not what caught my attention,  but this sure did - according to Valleynewslive.com "Fargo Police released stats from New Year’s Eve. Law enforcement is reporting there were no DUI-related arrests made overnight into New Year’s Day"

ZERO arrests in drunk driving on one of the biggest drinking nights of the year.

That to me is incredible. Some people may contribute that to the frigid temps that may have caused more people to stay at home. I would like to think that more North Dakotans have learned to think it through, to take the extra second to say to themself "It's not worth it". This was the best news I have heard in a while and an encouraging beginning of 2022.


LOOK: 50 famous memes and what they mean

With the infinite number of memes scattered across the internet, it's hard to keep track. Just when you've grasped the meaning of one hilarious meme, it has already become old news and replaced by something equally as enigmatic. Online forums like Tumblr, Twitter, 4chan, and Reddit are responsible for a majority of meme infections, and with the constant posting and sharing, finding the source of an original meme is easier said than done. Stacker hunted through internet resources, pop culture publications, and databases like Know Your Meme to find 50 different memes and what they mean. While the almost self-replicating nature of these vague symbols can get exhausting, memes in their essence can also bring people closer together—as long as they have internet access.

 

LOOK: Here are the pets banned in each state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to states, some organizations, including The Humane Society of the United States, advocate for federal, standardized legislation that would ban owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets.

Read on to see which pets are banned in your home state, as well as across the nation.